Saturday, January 31, 2015

Sale of Hampton Farm

The last land record in the set from the Sullivan County Court provides insight into the type of crops managed by my 6th-great-grandfather Samuel Hampton on his Cedar Creek farm. Without this record, I would not have known that Samuel a distillery and a mill on his lands.

On 19 December 1837, Samuel Hampton sold 172 acres on Cedar Creek neighboring James King's land to Gasper Smith. Gasper had married Samuel's daughter, Rachel Hampton. From the 1840 US Census, Hampton and Smith were neighbors.

Back in the 1830 US Census, Samuel and Michael Hampton are listed in the same household in Sullivan County, Tennessee. Michael was my 5th-great-grandfather, who would later move in a few years with his family to Montgomery County, Indiana with several of the brothers of Catherine and Mary Mahala Booher. Several doors down, James King is listed in the census record with an empty household. Another neighbor of the Hamptons was Adam Akard (spelled Ekard on the 1830 Census). He later married Samuel's youngest daughter Charlotte in 1840.


From the land records, it looks like Samuel and family had been living in Sullivan County for at least 40 years. By the time he entered into the agreement with Gasper Smith in 1837, he was likely nearing the end of his ability to manage the farm lands on Cedar Creek. My estimate is Samuel would have been about 64 year old.

In February 1838, the two men deposited a statement in Sullivan County Court granting Hampton the right to continue living on the land. The statement provides the name of Samuel's wife, which I had not seen on any other document previously.

"Know all men by these presents that I Samuel Hampton of the County of Sullivan and State of Tennessee for a valuable consideration to me in hand paid for Gasper Smith of the County and State of one said by executing a land to me bearing date the 23rd day of February during the same date as this instrument for the comfortable and decent maintenance in sickness and in health of my self and my wife Rachel during our material lives before the sealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged and bargained and said and confirmed and by these presents do bargain sell and consession unto the said Gasper Smith twelve head of cattle all my hogs one Mill and all implements belong to same two head of horses one wagon and all the geering and supliments thereunto belonging ploughs [unclear] with all and singular my farming utensils of every description also all my wheat on hand and wheat in the ground also all my corn on hand reserving the end of the house I now live in and kitchen and my household and kitchen furniture over every description until the decease of myself and my wife Rachel and after the death of us both Gasper Smith is to have all that belongs to us of said household and kitchen furniture not interferring with anything that belongs to my daughter Charlotte.

"To have and to hold all and singular the said goods and chattles unto the said Gasper Smith his heirs executors or administrators and assigns forever as witnessed and the said Samuel Hampton for my self my heirs executors administrators all and singular the goods and chattles unto the said Gasper Smith his heirs executors administrators and assigns against me the said Samuel Hampton my heirs executors administrators and against every and all other persons whatever shall and will warrant and forever defend in witness whereof. I have set my hand and seal this 23rd day of February 1838 in the presence of us. Samuel Hampton {seal}

George Burkhart
David Smith [his mark X]"

A second agreement was filed with the Court in November 1838, signed the same day as the earlier transaction granting Samuel and Rachel Hampton the right to continue living on their land during their lifetime.

"Know all men by these presents that I Samuel Hampton of the County of Sullivan and State of Tennessee have in consideration of the sum of One Thousand dollars to me in hand paid by Gasper Smith of the County and State aforesaid before the sealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge have bargained sold and confirmed and by these presents do bargain sell and confirm unto the said Gasper Smith to his heirs and assigns forever the following named property two head of horse beasts all the cattle on my farm one milk cow the property of my daughter Charlotte Hampton all the hogs on my farm all the grain I have on hand and all my crop of small grain now growing consisting of wheat corn oats and barley my wagon and horse gearing together with all my farming utensils consisting of plows hoes matlock and harrow my still and tools and apple mill with all the vessels belonging to my distillery my crops but same with all my household and kitchen furniture consisting of bedding one cupboard chairs and table together with same castings except such part or parts of my household and kitchen furniture as my be claimed or owned by my daughter Charlotte Hampton also my windmill and cutting knife and box.

"To have and to hold all and singular the said and chattles unto the said Gasper Smith his heirs against me the said Samuel Hampton my heirs executors administrators and against every and all other person or persons whatever shall warrant and by these presents forever defend the above named property to the said Gasper Smith his heirs and in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the 23rd day of February 1838 Samuel Hampton {seal}"

This was the last land record in Sullivan County involving Samuel Hampton. The next land record in the grantor-grantee index was from 17 February 1840, where Charlotte Hampton purchased 22 acres from James King on Cedar Creek. I do not yet have a copy of this record, but have sent a request back to the Court to see if this provides more insight into the Hampton family.




No comments:

Post a Comment